Free entry a good reason to visit top Thailand cultural draws

From now until the end of January is a great time to take a cultural voyage around the top historical and heritage sites in Thailand. The reason for this is that the Fine Arts Division of the national Ministry of Culture is offering free entry to one and all at 42 elite attractions until the 31 January 2017.

If you fancy a jaunt around the historical parks of Phimai in Nakhon Ratchasima, Sukhothai or Ayutthaya then you won’t have to pay to enter. The admission fee waiver does not apply to bicycles or other vehicles and people entering Sukhothai or Sri Satchanalai will still have to pay the standard charges for these.

In all, nine historical parks in the north central and northern regions of Thailand plus Mueang Sing in Kanchanaburi are free. A total of 32 national museums are also offering fee-free admission for the same period. These include the peerless Royal Barge Museum in Bangkok, Ramkhamhaeng Museum in Sukhothai and the Chiang Mai National Museum.

Travelling around Thailand is not difficult and the majority of its tourist destinations and cultural draws are linked together via a comprehensive bus, rail and flight network. 12GO ASIA offers the chance of building your own itinerary with a convenient online ticketing system covering more than 750 different locations.

Source

Back

Bangkok’s governor says the city’s sole Bus Rapid Transit line is not heading for the scrap heap after all. Aswin Kwanmuang told media reporters the service will not be axed as planned next month and instead fares will go up to cover a shortfall in income.

Authorities in Ho Chi Minh City say they are adding the finishing touches to a plan to turn the downtown precinct into a pedestrian one. Tran Quang Lam is the assistant-director of the city’s Transport Department and he says the 2.2km² zone would become a no-go area for all forms of motorised transport.

Architects and academics have united in a bid to persuade Thailand’s railway operator to save the nation’s heritage stations from the wrecking ball.  King Mongkut Institute of Technology’s Parinya Chukaew and leading architect Pongkwan Lassus say the country’s elderly rail stations have high cultural value.