Chiang Mai temple builds gigantic Songkran sand pagoda

A temple in Chiang Mai has built a massive sand pagoda to celebrate the forthcoming Songkran Festival. Resident monks and novices at Jedlin Temple built the 15 metre high sand structure with the help of people living in the Phra Singh sub-district of the northern Thai city.

The pagoda measures 10 metres on each of its four bottom sides and is built over five tiers. Each tier is held in place with walls fashioned from bamboo poles. The 12 flags mounted on the pagoda represent the 12 different yearly astrological signs used in Thailand.

At a dedication ceremony staged on Monday evening, the pagoda was crowned with a shade parasol. Jedlin Temple builds a sand pagoda every year for Songkran. This tradition is derived from the Buddhist custom of replacing the ground people may have carried away on their feet over the previous 12 months.

Many temples in Chiang Mai and the rest of the country do the same thing on the 14 April, but not on the scale of the Jedlin monument. Songkran is Thailand’s biggest festival and the whole country is on the move. 12GO ASIA says don’t delay in making reservations if planning to travel over the festive period. 

Our image of the pagoda under construction was supplied by Chiang Mai News.

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