Myanmar extends online visa options to Thailand land borders

Myanmar has extended its e-visa options to cover a trio of key land border checkpoints with neighbouring Thailand. Tourists and business travellers who pre-apply online for visas can now enter the country via gateways at Kawthaung, Myawaddy and Tachileik.

The additional visa option came into effect on 1 September. Myanmar e-visas are available from the Ministry of Labour, Immigration and Population’s official website. E-visas cost US$50 for tourists and US$70 for business travellers.

E-visas are valid for a single entry into Myanmar up to 90 days after they are issued by the ministry. Tourists can stay in the country for up to 28 days after their initial entry dates while business travellers get to stay for 70 days.

Once visitors apply and pay for the e-visa, the ministry issues an approval letter within three working days.  Commenting on the new e-visa gateways to Myanmar, the ministry statement said it hoped these would provide visitors with more convenience and choice.

Kawthaung (or Victoria Point) is in the far south of Myanmar and across the Kraburi River from the Thai town of Ranong. Myawaddy faces across to Mae Sot and Tachileik to Mae Sai, Thailand’s northernmost point. 12GO ASIA sells tickets for buses serving routes to the towns on the Thai side of the border.

Source

Back

Bangkok’s governor says the city’s sole Bus Rapid Transit line is not heading for the scrap heap after all. Aswin Kwanmuang told media reporters the service will not be axed as planned next month and instead fares will go up to cover a shortfall in income.

Authorities in Ho Chi Minh City say they are adding the finishing touches to a plan to turn the downtown precinct into a pedestrian one. Tran Quang Lam is the assistant-director of the city’s Transport Department and he says the 2.2km² zone would become a no-go area for all forms of motorised transport.

Architects and academics have united in a bid to persuade Thailand’s railway operator to save the nation’s heritage stations from the wrecking ball.  King Mongkut Institute of Technology’s Parinya Chukaew and leading architect Pongkwan Lassus say the country’s elderly rail stations have high cultural value.